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  • USDA announces updated dietary recommendations supporting moderating meat consumption
  • Despite Paleo-diet trends towards higher consumption of saturated fat, USDA leans towards fruits, veggies and whole grains
  • Cholesterol is no longer cause for concern but trans and saturated fat are
  • people are encouraged to follow diets that simply: •are higher in vegetables, fruits, and whole grains • include seafood and legumes; are moderate in dairy products (with an emphasis on low- and non-fat dairy) • are moderate in alcohol • are lower in meats (including red and processed meats) • are lower in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages • and are lower in refined grains."
  • Even for its 571 pages, the monograph will disappoint Americans who are looking for exact foods to be eaten in precise quantities.
  • people should focus on eating "high-trophic" seafood, like salmon, for its beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, as opposed to low-trophic catfish or crawfish.
  • Saturated fat is recommended only in moderate amounts—to constitute, at most, 10 percent of a person's daily calories
  • Latest research is suggesting genes may play an important role in injury risk
  • Genetic testing offers advances in injury prevention and could help athletes increase their competitive edge
  • Each year around 2 million adults go to the emergency room for sports-related injuries
  • Vegetable consumption was on the decline between 2001 and 2010 even as each of us now eat 202.3 pounds of meat a year
  • This year, for the first time, the dietary committee might caution against overconsumption of all kinds of meat
  • Eating fewer animal-based foods "is more health promoting and is associated with a lesser environmental impact," suggested the committee.
  • Latest health research and environmental concerns are affecting the USDA guidelines for Americans' diets
  • For the first time, USDA may recommend reducing consumption of meat due to its environmental footprint
  • Warnings about high cholesterol are also gone yet there's still an emphasis on reducing sugar
  • Each year, around 2 million adults go to the emergency room for sports-related injuries,
  • Companies like 23andMe, DNAFit, and Stanford Sports Genetics offer genetic tests that can tell the average consumer about his or her risk for sports injuries
  • specific variations of a collagen gene named COL1A1 were under-represented in a group of recreational athletes who had suffered traumatic ACL injuries
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